Kyle Shanahan: 'I want Robert to be Robert'

Kyle Shanahan: 'I want Robert to be Robert'
November 14, 2013, 5:00 pm
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Kyle Shanahan, 6 systems in 6 years

Although Robert Griffin III has experienced his share of inconsistencies since returning from knee surgery, offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan remains bullish on his second-year signal caller. 

Asked on Wednesday if Griffin will eventually need to develop into a pocket passer—the increasing number of hits he’s absorbed in recent games was a topic of conversation in Ashburn this week—Shanahan disagreed, saying it’s Griffin’s unique skill set that sets him apart.

“I want Robert to be Robert,” Shanahan said. “I don’t want him to Peyton Manning. I want him to be Robert. What’s good about Robert is he’s capable of having qualities like Peyton Manning. He can be a great passer. He is already a good thrower. He is, at times, really good in the pass game. But he hasn’t had those reps since he was 6 years old like somebody like Peyton has.”

Through nine games, Griffin ranks ninth in passing yards (2,450), 17th in completion percentage (60.8) and 18th in passing touchdown (12). He also ranks fifth among quarterbacks in rushing yards with 301 on 56 carries.

“Robert has always been able to run,” Griffin said. “He’s been able to get away from trouble. And when you can do that your entire life and make plays, you don’t have to sit in [the pocket] as much and throw. But Robert’s more than capable of being [a pocket passer], he’s more than capable of being a great thrower and the more he works at that, he can be as well-rounded and have more weapons than anybody does.”

Shanahan also said it’s Griffin’s potential to improve as a passer that makes him special.

“I don’t think someone like Peyton or Tom Brady, can say, ‘Hey, if I keep working on my zone read, maybe I can have a little bit of Robert’s game, too,’” Shanahan added. “They have no choice. They have to be what they are. Robert has a choice. He can win a game with his legs. He can win it with his arms. The more he plays, the more situations he gets put in, the more he’ll be capable of being great in all areas. And that’s why I think the ceiling on him is so [high.]”