Colonials look to capture fifth conference win

Colonials look to capture fifth conference win
February 5, 2013, 9:15 pm
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By Leah Pascarella

CSNwashington.com

GW men’s basketball coach Mike Lonergan and his team look to start a new winning streak Wednesday against Atlantic 10 conference foe Duquesne.

The Colonials (10-10, 4-3) are coming off a tough 80-71 loss to LaSalle last Saturday afternoon. That loss ended their three-game win streak against A-10 opponents.

Three veterans and three rookies comprise this year's GW team working to capture the A-10 title. The mix of experience on the court proves to be successful for Lonergan and the Colonials as they handedly beat teams like Charlotte, who was tied for first in the A-10 before falling to GW.

Standout Senior Isaiah Armwood leads GW in points and rebounds, averaging more than 12 points and eight boards. Experienced veterans Lasan Kromah and Dwayne Smith average 9.5 and 7.1 points, respectively. These seniors dominate the playing field and have the leadership Lonergan depends on.

The Colonials also have some new faces running the team this season. Freshmen Patricio Garino, Kevin Larsen, and Joe McDonald have been key contributors their first season at GW. With Garino leading the team in steals and McDonald in assists (averaging 3.5 per game), these three underclassmen are anything but inexperienced.

Combining the freshmen with the seasoned veterans may just be Lonergan’s key to success this season. With all six players averaging at least seven points per game, this group has proved they are a top contendor for the A-10 title.

Last season, GW narrowly edged Duquesne (7-14, 0-7) with a close 56-51 win at home in the only meeting between the teams. This year, the Colonials have a new look and a new wave of confidence that is already making this season more successful than last.

The future looks bright for GW with so many underclassmen putting up big numbers. Rebounding from the LaSalle loss will show if the young players are learning the lessons needed to develop into an NCAA Tournament squad down the road.